How I veiw my greatest of Ancestral Grandfather’s Loki: Who was he really?

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Most people of modern times only know the aspect of Loki due Snorri’s account of him in the Eddas.

When one seriously begins to delve into the Scandinavian mythology, it becomes apparent the Gods probably had much more depth and breadth to their characters than the Christian Snorri Sturluson (who was also an Icelandic historian, poet, and politician) penned down in the 13th Century.

I have come to understand my personal heathen path as being based on Ancestral veneration before the Christian conversion; so understanding what that concept really means, I feel quite possibly the Entities we now know as God’s were actual people at one time who became God’s due to their exceptional lives recorded orally since humans began telling legendary tales of their tribal Hero’s.

With that said (and due to the fact I have since a child of 8 been visited and recived guidance by the entity known as Loki) upon getting a serious illness when a child, an Ancestral guide came to my sickbed and informed me early on I was a descendant of his family line. He also told me his identity, and it was through that childhood interaction I came to understand each Tribe of whom we call ‘God’s’ today, represent the different stages of human history and evolution; the Jontunn being early Indiginous man, the Vanir when man transitioned from hunter/gatherers, and the Aesir was when man grew into war driven “civilization” based creatures.

~And to be clear, even if they once might have been living flesh, they are no less the powerful divine entities as we know them today.

I am a Heathen pagan and shaman, and I am also a Norse Witch, so obviously I put much value on my UPG (duh, how else would I experience a spiritual awakening?) but I also value any historical evidence I can find, be it folklore or otherwise.

So in honor of one of my original forbearing creators, I am sharing this post as to bring up the notion Loki was much more than simply a Trickster, or worse, just a thorn in the side of the Scandinavian pantheon.
~skal! -Ivy M

Identification with Lóðurr
A popular theory proposed by the scholar Ursula Dronke is that Lóðurr is “a third name of Loki/Loptr”. The main argument for this is that the gods Odin, Hœnir and Loki occur as a trio in Haustlöng, in the prose prologue to Reginsmál and also in the Loka Táttur a Faroese ballad, an example of Norse deities appearing in later folklore. The Odin-kenning “Lóðurr’s friend” furthermore appears to parallel the kenning “Loptr’s friend” and Loki is similarly referred to as “Hœnir’s friend” in Haustlöng, strengthening the trio connection. While many scholars agree with this identification, it is not universally accepted. One argument against it is that Loki appears as a malevolent being later in Völuspá, seemingly conflicting with the image of Lóðurr as a “mighty and loving” figure. Many scholars, including Jan de Vries and Georges Dumézil, have also identified Lóðurr as being the same deity as Loki. Scholar Haukur Þorgeirsson suggests that Loki and Lóðurr were different names for the same deity based on that Loki is referred to as Lóður in the rímur Lokrur. Þorgeirsson argues that the writer must have had information about the identification from either a tradition or that the author drew the conclusion based on the Prose Edda, as Snorri does not mention Lóðurr. Since the contents of the Poetic Edda are assumed to have been forgotten around 1400 when the rímur was written, Haukur argues for a traditional identification. Þorgeirsson also points to Þrymlur where the same identification is made with Loki and Lóðurr. Haukur says that unless the possible but unlikely idea that the 14th- and 15th-century poets possessed written sources unknown to us is true, the idea must have come from either an unlikely amount of sources from where the poets could have drawn a similar conclusion that Loki and Lóðurr are identical (like some recent scholars) or that remnants of an oral tradition remained. Haukur concludes that if Lóðurr was historically considered an independent deity from Loki, then a discussion of when and why he became identified with Loki is appropriate.

Since the Prose Edda mentions the sons of Borr in the same context as Völuspá does Hœnir and Lóðurr, some scholars have reasoned that Lóðurr might be another name for either Vili or Vé. Viktor Rydberg was an early proponent of this theory, but recently it has received little attention.

The name’s meaning is unknown. It has been speculatively linked to various Old Norse words, such as lóð, “fruit, land”, ljóðar, “people” and laða, “to attract”. The Gothic words liudan, “to grow” and laudi, “shape”, as well as the German word lodern, “to blaze”, have also been mentioned in this context.
A more popular theory proposed by the scholar Ursula Dronke is that Lóðurr is “a third name of Loki/Loptr”. The main argument for this is that the gods Odin, Hœnir and Loki occur as a trio in Haustlöng, in the prose prologue to Reginsmál and also in the Loka Táttur a Faroese ballad which is a rare example of the occurrence of Norse gods in folklore. The Odin-kenning “Lóðurr’s friend” furthermore appears to parallel the kenning “Loptr’s friend” and Loki is similarly referred to as “Hœnir’s friend” in Haustlöng, strengthening the trio connection. While many scholars agree with this identification, it is not universally accepted. One argument against it is that Loki appears as a malevolent being later in Völuspá, seemingly conflicting with the image of Lóðurr as a “mighty and loving” figure. Many scholars, including Jan de Vries and Georges Dumézil, have also identified Lóðurr as being the same deity as Loki.

Recently, Haukur Þorgeirsson of the University of Iceland suggested that Loki and Lóðurr were different names of the same deity based on that Loki is referred to as Lóður in the rimur Lokrur. Haukur argues that whatever if the rimur is based on Snorri’s Gylfaginning or a folksource the writer must have had the information about the identification from either a tradition or drawing the conclusion based on Edda poems, since Snorri does not mention Lóðurr in his Edda. Since the contents of the Poetic Edda are assumed to have been forgotten around 1400 when the rimur was written Haukur argues for a traditional identification. Haukur also points to Þrymlur where the same identification is made with Loki and Lóðurr. Haukur Þorgeirsson says that unless the possible but unlikely idea that the 14th and 15th century poets possessed lost written sources unknown to us, the idea must have come from either an unlikely amount of sources from where the poets could have drawn a similar conclusion that Loki and Lóðurr are identical like some recent scholars or that there still were remnants of an oral tradition. Haukur concludes that if Lóðurr was historically considered an independent deity from Loki, then a discussion of when and why he became identified with Loki is appropriate.

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